Monday, December 18, 2006

Uses of Appreciative Inquiry

Intelligent Coaching E-Brief

Uses of Appreciative Inquiry

December 18, 2006 Volume 1, Number 8


In this Issue:

What is Appreciative Inquiry

Appreciative Types of Inquiry
Getting to the Heart of an Organization

Contact Us:

http://www.executiveintellligentcoaching.com
info@executiveintelligentcoaching.com
512.947.5447


What is Appreciative Inquiry

Appreciative Inquiry is an attitude; it is a way of approaching groups of people, organizations, and systems from the human experience. Appreciative Inquiry seeks to create positive changes and results by focusing on what currently and previously has worked well. From there, the activities and efforts align to leverage and replicate the successes. For more information, reference David L. Cooperrider for a good introduction on Appreciative Inquiry.


Appreciative Types of Inquiry

What are our beliefs about our organization and the people who work in it? This strikes at the core of Appreciative Inquiry theory. It espouses that the questions we ask of people and ourselves, in and of themselves catapult the eventuality of what will be. In Appreciative Inquiry the questions that are posed verbally or internally, are a catalyst for the interventions that occur.

Examples of some possible questions include:
What is a specific example of a project that worked very well? Who was involved? What features contributed to the success? What was the motivation behind the project, that the group (members, participants, etc.) identified? How did the group react in response to the success of the project?

These questions all pertain to the same situation. When you acquire thorough responses to all of these questions, you end up with a very positive perspective about this group, their skills, and the types of projects they orchestrate well. When you share this information back to the group, you have then imparted on them this same positive understanding for it to be built upon.



Getting to the Heart of an Organization

What is the motivating force or central purpose within an organization? The inherent values? When has the organization been seen to function at its very best? What is the area of greatest issue within the organization/When was it most successful?

Through the use of Appreciative Inquiry, shift the focus within the organization from what is wrong, to what is working, when it worked, and how it worked well. In concert, the desired future becomes affirmed in these experiences of past success. Use the successes to build upon themselves in moving to the sought outcome. Throughout the process of incorporating Appreciative Inquiry into the organization, the consciousness of the group becomes what they will attain.


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For implementing strategies like those mentioned above, or your other professional needs, contact Nancy Schill, M.A. at: nschill@executiveintelligentcoaching.com or 512.947.5447 to schedule your Professional Agenda coaching session, Development coaching program, or Team coaching program.
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Friday, November 17, 2006

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Podcast

To hear a panel discussion on the MBTI, for entrepreneurs and working with people, click on: http://www.hearthis.com/index.php/features/bootstrapper_personality/ . Nancy's introduction provides an explanation of the 4 dichotomies, hallmark descriptions of some of the 16 personality types, and the MBTI Step II.

Monday, November 13, 2006

Emotional Intelligence at Work

Intelligent Coaching E-Letter

Emotional Intelligence at Work

Date: November 17, 2006
Volume 1, Number 7



In this Issue:
Statistics
Emotional Intelligence at Work
Issue Tip


Contact Us:
http://www.executiveintelligentcoaching.com
info@executiveintelligentcoaching.com
512.947.5447


Statistics

In a study of 12,000 managers and executives, it was found that 80% of star performers' competencies were related to Emotional Intelligence.
Boyatzis, Weatherford School of Management

Fundamental elements of Emotional Intelligence such as: self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills, support the skills that account for 76% of the effectiveness of leading managers.
Goleman, '98 Working with Emotional Intelligence

A study of PepsiCo executives with high Emotional Intelligence outperformed peers by ~ 35%.
McClelland, '98 Psychological Sciences


Emotional Intelligence at Work


Most of us know that cognitive intelligence is something we're born with. And, that some people are naturally "smarter" than others. Some people have excellent problem-solving skills; some are mathematically gifted. Whereas, others have an extensive vocabulary and are linguistically skillful. Still, others are very creative or exceptionally artistic. All of which comes from the wiring in our brains, that we're born with. Our cognitive intelligence. Then, there is the technical expertise and knowledge that people develop through experience in a job or training and education in their field. But these aren't the only factors that determine people's performance and success. Emotional intelligence are the skills that you use to guide yourself and your relationships for success.

We all know of people who are really "smart", yet they just aren't very successful. We also may know people who don't seem very bright, yet they just seem to do really well; and surprisingly, things just seem to go their way. The research shows that a lot of what determines our success, is this "emotional intelligence". It is: how you do your job; accessing the full potential of your talents; and your capacity for learning skills for self-awareness, motivation, self-regulation, empathy, and relationship skills. Will your work benefit from you being interpersonally adept and emotionally competent? You bet.

Emotional intelligence can be broadly understood as one's self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and social management. There are 18 or so emotional intelligence competencies identified under this framework. And, fortunately, emotional intelligence is something that we learn; it's not something that we're born with. There are numerous books, articles, and resources to teach about how emotional intelligence affects our personal lives and work. There is a myriad of research available, pointing to the benefits of enhancing these skills. The information points to: improve your emotional intelligence and you will improve your success.


Issue Tip

Take an inventory of yourself on these 5 domains of emotional intelligence: self-awareness; motivation; self-regulation; empathy; and social skills. Identify for each, if there are any particular situations where you exhibit a strength with this domain. Then, identify instances where you may have challenges. Seek information and/or opportunities to practice developing some of the weaker skills.


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Nancy Schill is the Founder and Executive Coach for Executive Intelligent Coaching. She has attended the College of Executive Coaching, a post graduate training institute which is accredited by the International Coach Federation. She has a master's degree in School Psychology and a bachelor's degree in Psychology.

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For improving your emotional intelligence skills or your other professional needs, contact Nancy Schill at nschill@executiveintelligencecoaching.com or 512.947.5447 to schedule your Professional Agenda coaching session, Development coaching program, or Team coaching program.





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Thursday, October 12, 2006

Operating from a Place of Strengths

Intelligent Coaching E-Brief

Operating from a Place of Strengths


Date: October 12, 2006 Volume 1, Number 6


In this Issue:

Knowing your Strengths
Structure your Environment
Benefits of a Strengths' Perspective


Contact Us:

http://www.executiveintelligentcoaching.com
info@executiveintelligentcoaching.com
512.947.5447


Knowing your Strengths

Where do your natural strengths lie? Consider things that people have told you throughout your life. Think about times when you felt very fulfilled and satisfied. What were you specifically doing at the time? Ask people who know you well and people you work closely with, "what they see you doing comfortably and repeatedly". Note the common pieces from all these activities. Your awareness of these natural strengths will serve you in the future, if not immediately.


Structure your Environment

How much of your workday is spent doing what you do best? This is important because, operating in your areas of natural strengths are where you will be the most effective! Think about structuring your environment so that you can spend more and more of your time on tasks that you're naturally good at and that come easy to you. These may be things that come so naturally to you, you're not even aware that you're doing them. For the other hundred things that you do, see who around you may have natural strengths in some of those other areas. Then, trade some of your tasks with that person or better yet, delegate the tasks within your group or organization to fit with people's individual strengths.


Benefits of a Strengths' Perspective

So, why do you want to take a strengths' approach opposed to a weaknesses' approach in your life and your organization? First, doesn't it feel simply a little nicer when you think, "strengths"? Now, listen to yourself say it, "strengths". For so long we have talked about our weaknesses within our society. Many of us have even worked to remediate our weaknesses and, likely that was needed. However, will you ever become brilliant and completely comfortable with details, organization, competition, or communication, if it is something that is naturally challenging to you? Not likely. So, why not embrace what naturally comes easy to you and what you do well? It can be freeing and motivating when you get used to this shift in perspective. What's more, the research suggests that you will then have: higher productivity, lower turnover, and higher customer satisfaction!


Imagine the possibilities!

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For implementing strategies like those mentioned above, or your other professional needs, contact Nancy Schill, M.A. at: nschill@executiveintelligentcoaching.com or 512.947.5447 to schedule your Professional Agenda coaching session, Development coaching program, or Team coaching program.

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Please send a link to this blog to your friends or colleagues who may find it beneficial.

Thursday, September 21, 2006

Emotional Intelligence Podcast

To hear a brief introduction on Emotional Intelligence, how it relates to your business, or how Nancy incorporates this into her coaching work, click on this link to go to her podcast interview: http://www.insightsintomarketing.com/2006/09/18/podcast-nancy-schill-on-emotional-intelligence/ .

Friday, September 08, 2006

Effective Leaders and Those Who Get the Results

Intelligent Coaching E-Brief


Effective Leaders and Those Who Get the Results
Date: September 11, 2006 Volume 1, Number 5


In this Issue:
Effective Leaders and Those Who Get the Results:
Applying Leadership
Modeling
New Strategies and Change


Contact Us:
512.947.5447
Applying Leadership

In looking at the different styles of leadership, timing and amount of the chosen style, all are important. For example, are you coaching your team on how to approach a new account? When are you doing the coaching? And, how much are you coaching them? The finesse a leader uses with different styles, with the right timing and to the appropriate degree, all contribute to the leader's effectiveness. Think about what it is that you're wanting to accomplish with your leadership in a given opportunity.


Modeling

Clearly and consistently set the examples of what it is you're wanting done. What you do and how regularly you do it, will be observed by those you're leading. Remember that, when in a leadership role, you are setting the stage for the actions that are expected. In this role, eyes and ears are on you. If you are regularly late into work or are heard repeatedly talking to another in a condescending tone, then the perception may be that those are your expectations. Therefore, model the actions that you want, clearly and consistently.


New Strategies and Change

Look for situations where you can try new strategies or take some small risks. When you find yourself with a new challenge, use your innovation to try something new, a new approach, method, strategy, etc. Think of this an opportunity for learning something new, and maybe finding something better. Furthermore, if you're wanting to change things in your organization or yourself, then consider taking small steps toward that change. The successes will build confidence and dedication. The mistakes can be learned from. The focus here is on overall progress. What may this small step cost you, and what may the result be of step, built on step, over time?

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For implementing strategies like those mentioned above, or your other professional needs, contact Nancy Schill at: nschill@executiveintelligentcoaching.com or 512.947.5447 to schedule your Professional Agenda coaching session, Development coaching program, or Team coaching program.

Please send a link to this blog to your friends or colleagues who may find it beneficial.

Thursday, August 10, 2006

Working in a Team

Intelligent Coaching E-Letter

Working in a Team

Date: August 14, 2006 Volume 1, Number 4


In this Issue:

Issue Tip
Working Together in a Team
Quote

Contact Us:
http://www.executiveintelligentcoaching.com
nschill@executiveintelligentcoaching.com
512.947.5447

Issue Tip

How are we communicating within our team? Are our private and group conclusions based on assumptions or facts? Before making conclusions ask specific questions and keep asking questions so that the conclusions are logically derived and are not rooted in presumption. Thereby, avoiding potentially problematic executions.

Working Together in a Team

How do we work together in a team and how do we facilitate the team so that it is effective and we succeed in our objective?

While most will have answered this last piece, the objective of the team, at the outset, it is important to carefully review this objective so that it is clear and unambiguous. It seems so elementary to say, "Make sure the team knows what the objective is." Yet, often times, this first piece gets covered in the pile of all that is going on, keeps getting diluted from its original purpose, or is morphed into something other than what it was intended and needs to be. Therefore, when a team gets off track or seems to be chasing itself down a rabbit hole, it is important to remind the team what the objective is and bring the focus back to that objective.

So, why do we need a team to achieve our objective?

Realize that a team will be created or sought because of specific reasons. Are you running a business and have a team of employees, or are you forming a team for a specific project? Regardless of the situation, each member has an expertise, a gift they can bring to the team, even if it is their individuality (like their specific personality preferences and strengths). Each of the members will have an affect and contribute to the outcome that the team is seeking.

There are two separate pieces for each member of a team. One, what is their particular role. Two, how are they going to collaborate with the team. Each of these pieces will be slightly different for every member. Then we must consider, are we the leader of the team or is someone else the leader? Remember that while the members' roles may be different, everyone on the team has their own unique opportunities and responsibilities.

Quote

Indeed, world-class performances aren't possible unless there's a strong sense of shared creation and shared responsibility.

James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner, The Leadership Challenge

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Nancy Schill is the Founder and Executive Coach for Executive Intelligent Coaching. She has attended the College of Executive Coaching, a post graduate training institute which is accredited by the International Coach Federation. She has a master's degree in School Psychology and a bachelor's degree in Psychology.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

For implementing strategies like those mentioned above, or
your other professional needs, contact Nancy Schill at:
nschill@executiveintelligentcoaching.com or 512.947.5447
to schedule your Professional Agenda coaching session,
Development coaching program, or Team coaching program.

_________________________________________________________

Please send a link to this blog to your friends or
colleagues who may find it beneficial.

Thursday, July 13, 2006

Considerations for How to Improve the Motivation of Ourselves and Others

Intelligent Coaching E-Brief


Considerations for How to Improve the Motivation of Ourselves and Others

Date: July 13, 2006 Volume 1, Number 3

In This Issue:

Considerations for How to Improve the Motivation of Ourselves and Others

  • Motivation of an Individual
  • Motivation Comes From
  • Maintaining Motivation

Contact Us:

http://www.executiveintelligentcoaching.com

nschill@executiveintelligentcoaching.com

512.947.5447

Motivation of an Individual

What motivates someone is unique to the given individual. Many times we make an assumption about what motivates a person. Look at what you're assuming motivates a person. Is it based on facts you obtained or possibly a flawed assumption? Seek to answer this by asking the individual specific, pointed questions. Then, your subsequent behaviors can be rooted in factual information, not presumption.


Motivation Derived From

What is one's meaning and passion behind their tasks, projects, or responsibilities? If you are continually working in a situation that undermines your meaning and passion, what happens to your motivation? Consider what you can do to foster your meaning and passion and those of another individual, even though theirs may be different then your own.

Maintaining Motivation

How do we maintain our motivation on a regular basis, when times are challenging, or when productivity is low and the rewards just don't seem to be coming in? Remind yourself during your daily activities how they are connected to your desired future. How do the activities relate to what you're striving for, how you see yourself, and what you want?

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For implementing strategies like those mentioned above, or your other professional needs, contact Nancy Schill at nschill@executiveintelligentcoaching.com or 512.947.5447 to schedule your Professional Agenda coaching session, Development coaching program, or Team coaching program.

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Please send a link to this blog to your friends or colleagues who may find it beneficial.