Thursday, August 10, 2006

Working in a Team

Intelligent Coaching E-Letter

Working in a Team

Date: August 14, 2006 Volume 1, Number 4


In this Issue:

Issue Tip
Working Together in a Team
Quote

Contact Us:
http://www.executiveintelligentcoaching.com
nschill@executiveintelligentcoaching.com
512.947.5447

Issue Tip

How are we communicating within our team? Are our private and group conclusions based on assumptions or facts? Before making conclusions ask specific questions and keep asking questions so that the conclusions are logically derived and are not rooted in presumption. Thereby, avoiding potentially problematic executions.

Working Together in a Team

How do we work together in a team and how do we facilitate the team so that it is effective and we succeed in our objective?

While most will have answered this last piece, the objective of the team, at the outset, it is important to carefully review this objective so that it is clear and unambiguous. It seems so elementary to say, "Make sure the team knows what the objective is." Yet, often times, this first piece gets covered in the pile of all that is going on, keeps getting diluted from its original purpose, or is morphed into something other than what it was intended and needs to be. Therefore, when a team gets off track or seems to be chasing itself down a rabbit hole, it is important to remind the team what the objective is and bring the focus back to that objective.

So, why do we need a team to achieve our objective?

Realize that a team will be created or sought because of specific reasons. Are you running a business and have a team of employees, or are you forming a team for a specific project? Regardless of the situation, each member has an expertise, a gift they can bring to the team, even if it is their individuality (like their specific personality preferences and strengths). Each of the members will have an affect and contribute to the outcome that the team is seeking.

There are two separate pieces for each member of a team. One, what is their particular role. Two, how are they going to collaborate with the team. Each of these pieces will be slightly different for every member. Then we must consider, are we the leader of the team or is someone else the leader? Remember that while the members' roles may be different, everyone on the team has their own unique opportunities and responsibilities.

Quote

Indeed, world-class performances aren't possible unless there's a strong sense of shared creation and shared responsibility.

James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner, The Leadership Challenge

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Nancy Schill is the Founder and Executive Coach for Executive Intelligent Coaching. She has attended the College of Executive Coaching, a post graduate training institute which is accredited by the International Coach Federation. She has a master's degree in School Psychology and a bachelor's degree in Psychology.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

For implementing strategies like those mentioned above, or
your other professional needs, contact Nancy Schill at:
nschill@executiveintelligentcoaching.com or 512.947.5447
to schedule your Professional Agenda coaching session,
Development coaching program, or Team coaching program.

_________________________________________________________

Please send a link to this blog to your friends or
colleagues who may find it beneficial.

No comments: